Anthropology -- ANTH


Department Homepage: https://inverhills.edu/DegreesAndPrograms/Anthropology/

 

ANTH 1100  Introduction to Anthropology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1100

Introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and language. Anthropology, is the study of humanity. Within each subfield are various, practical applications which are collectively termed applied anthropology. Students will learn to identify and apply anthropological study methods. Included within this knowledge will be the application of holistic, comparative, and evolutionary avenues of anthropological inquiry into the issues and institutions that affect our complex, modern lives.

ANTH 1101  Introduction to American Culture   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1101

Explores the cultural variety that comprises the current American population and the issues that drive Americans today. This course provides an introduction to American culture with emphasis on those who have arrived in the past 200 years including their transitions, mobility, and interchange. Classroom discussions, lectures and activities will focus on the effects of each succeeding immigrant group on American culture through the operation of American Dominant Culture, worldview, and institutions; with focus primarily on the role of the individual and consumerism within American society.

ANTH 1110  Cultural Anthropology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1110

Introduces students to the anthropological subfield focused on human culture. Culture is that complex whole which includes knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom, and any other capabilities and habits acquired by individuals as a member of society. Examines the tension between the claim that culture can be both universal as well as particular. This class offers a broad survey allowing for this comparison of universals and particulars around the world, including larger concepts of identity, cultural manifestation, operation of institutions, and issues of inequality and globalization.

ANTH 1120  Introduction to Archaeology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1120

Introduces students to the archaeological field and profession. Archaeology, one of the four sub-fields within anthropology, is the study of human material culture and is typically done by examining objects and locations left behind by various groups throughout human history. Students will examine the history, methods, and basic theories of archaeology. Additionally, students will learn how the archaeological profession is conducted today and apply this to highlighting issues of community development and expression, subsistence, status, consumption, gender, and other contemporary issues.

ANTH 1130  Introduction to Biological Anthropology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1130

Introduces the biological anthropology field, one of the four sub-fields within anthropology. Sometimes called physical anthropology, biological anthropology is the study of our collective human origins. Students will accomplish this through three main areas: study of biological evolution, including the forces of evolution and cellular biology; comparing primate and human physical and behavioral practices; and by examining hominid evolution from groups beginning four to five million years ago through today as they are shaped by environmental and cultural stimuli. Study will be done through a variety of in class discussions and lectures as well as simulated or dry lab activities. Additionally, students will learn how modern cultural implications impact our evolution and environment today. May be paired with ANTH 1131 to fulfill a lab science requirement.

ANTH 1131  Introduction to Biological Anthropology Lab   1.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1131

Provides an optional lab with hands on experience for the lecture sections of ANTH 1130 (Introduction to Biological Anthropology). The lab covers scientific method, cell biology and DNA, principles of inheritance, human variation, population genetics, the human skeleton, primate classification, primate behavior, bipedal adaptation and comparative analysis of hominin features including Australopithicines and Homo. This course must be paired with ANTH 1130 to fulfill a lab science requirement.

ANTH 1150  Introduction to American Indian Cultures   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1150

Introduces students to American Indian cultures from an anthropological perspective. This is accomplished through three primary avenues: a broad survey of cultures prior to European colonization; the historical-cultural experiences that contributed to present day Native American communities; and finally issues in modern American Indian communities and their relationships with anthropologists. Specific North American culture areas from the Midwest and Great Plains, through the Southeast and Southwest will be surveyed.

ANTH 1160  Migrants and Refugees   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 1160

Examines the dimensions of transnational migration and refugee displacement in the US and globally. This course provides an introduction to the concepts, themes and dynamics that anthropologists consider when examining the lives of social groups who voluntarily and involuntarily leave their home country. Students will examine and apply anthropological analyses to ethnographic case studies of migration and refugee experiences. Classroom discussions, lectures and activities will explore worldwide political, economic and social issues to try to understand the current period of widespread migration and displacement holistically.

ANTH 2100  Visual Anthropology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 2100

Introduces students to the exceptional cultural diversity of expression in the world today. Visual anthropology is a subfield of cultural anthropology that is concerned with the study and production of art, photography, film, and new media; including areas such as performance, museums, and mass media. Students examine the purposes of visual, cultural representations; from conformity and conflict, to personal perception and propaganda. Extending from cave paintings and sand paintings to hieroglyphics and modern media outlets, and on to tattoos and texting; students will examine their own and other's ethical concepts in a variety of institutional settings throughout the modern world. Prerequisites: Recommended ANTH 1100 or 1110.

ANTH 2120  Field Experience in Archaeology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 2120

Introduces students to the archaeological field and the American Cultural Resource Management (CRM) profession. Archaeology, one of the four sub-fields within anthropology, is the study of human material culture and is typically done by examining objects and locations left behind by various groups throughout human history. This course gives students the opportunity to more closely examine how archaeology is applied primarily through implementation of the National Historic Preservation Act and the resulting creation of CRM as the mainstay of employment within archaeology today. Students will spend approximately half of their time in the classroom with the remainder in the field; observing and experiencing various archaeological sites, museums, historical societies, etc. Students will learn how the archaeological profession highlights issues of community engagement, development, and expressions. Prerequisites: Recommended ANTH 1120.

ANTH 2130  Introduction to Medical Anthropology   3.0 cr
Course Outline for ANTH 2130

Growing specialization within anthropology, medical anthropology draws upon socio-cultural, linguistic and biological anthropology to understand those factors that affect human health and illness. This course introduces students to this field of study and the cross-cultural, political and ethical considerations involved in solving real-world problems related to human health and illness. Through the examination of case studies students will learn ways to apply principles of medical anthropology to solve contemporary issues facing our communities. Prerequisites: None, but ANTH 1110 or ANTH 1130 recommended, but not required.